Celebrate 10 years of Bake Off with recipes from judge Prue Leith (2024)

Today, in the final part of our mouthwatering series from the new Great British Bake Off book, the contestants on this year’s show share some of their home recipes.

Whether inspired by childhood memories or a beloved family member, their creations are easy to make and perfect for a scrumptious teatime treat.

There’s also a technical challenge from Prue: angel cake slices. On your marks… get set… bake!

Great British Bake Off presentersPaul Hollywood and Prue Leith are pictured above. Today the contestants on this year’s show share some of their home recipes

Angel cake slices

This is Prue’s take on the retro English angel cake. The pretty decoration is super-easy: a co*cktail stick and stripes of pink icing are all it takes.

Hands-on: 1 ¼ hours

Bake: 15 mins

Makes 6

You will need:

  • 2-in-1 parchment and foil cut to a rectangle of 50 x 20cm
  • Traybake tin 33 x 25cm
  • Sugar thermometer
  • Small piping bag fitted with a medium writing nozzle
  • co*cktail stick.

For the genoise

  • 60g unsalted butter, melted and cooled, plus extra for greasing
  • 4 large eggs at room temperature
  • 120g caster sugar
  • 120g plain flour, sifted
  • ½ tsp vanilla extract
  • ½ tsp natural raspberry flavouring
  • Pink food-colouring gel
  • Finely grated zest of 1 small unwaxed lemon
  • Yellow food-colouring gel

This is Prue’s take on the retro English angel cake. The pretty decoration is super-easy: a co*cktail stick and stripes of pink icing are all it takes

For the meringue buttercream

  • 100g caster sugar
  • 1 large egg white
  • 85g unsalted butter, softened

For the fondant icing

  • 250g fondant icing sugar
  • Pink food-colouring gel

For the genoise

fold the foiled parchment to divide the cake tin into three 20 x 10cm sections with the parchment side facing upwards, and grease with melted butter.

Heat the oven to 190c/fan 170c/ 375f/gas 5. Tip the eggs and sugar in a bowl set over a pan of gently simmering water.

Whisk until the sugar has dissolved and the mixture reaches 43c/109f on the sugar thermometer.

Weigh the mixture in the bowl of a stand mixer and record the weight (to help you divide it later).

Whisk the mixture in the mixer until it is thick and mousse-like and leaves a ribbon trail when you lift the whisk out.

Meanwhile, divide the flour evenly between three small bowls. Do the same for the butter. Stir the vanilla into one bowl of butter.

Stir the raspberry flavouring and a small drop of pink food colouring into the second bowl of butter, and the lemon zest and a small drop of yellow food colouring into the third.

Divide the whisked egg mixture into three bowls. Working with one bowl of egg mixture, flour and butter at a time, sift the flour over the egg mixture and fold in. Add the butter and fold in — work quickly to prevent the mixture collapsing.

Repeat with the remaining bowls to give three mixtures — vanilla, raspberry and lemon.

Pour each into a section of the cake tin and bake for 12-15 minutes, until the tops spring back when pressed. Cool a little in the tin, then transfer to a wire rack to cool completely.

For meringue buttercream

Melt the sugar in 3 tablespoons of water very gently in a pan over a low heat. Meanwhile, whisk the egg white to soft peaks in the clean bowl of a stand mixer.

Once the sugar has dissolved, increase the heat to a rapid boil until the syrup reaches 121c/250f on a sugar thermometer. Remove the pan from the heat.

With the whisk at full speed, slowly pour the hot syrup onto the egg whites in a thin stream. Keep whisking until the meringue is thick and glossy and has cooled to room temperature.

Gradually add the butter, whisking after each addition until the buttercream is smooth and thick. Chill until firm.

To assemble

trim the sponges so they are identical in size and height. Spread half the buttercream over the vanilla sponge and top with the raspberry sponge.

Spread the other half of the buttercream over the raspberry sponge and top with the lemon sponge (you might not need all the buttercream).

For the fondant icing

Sift the icing sugar into a bowl and add 1½-2 tablespoons of water to mix to a stiff, dropping consistency.

Spoon one quarter of the icing into a small bowl and colour it pink. Spoon the pink icing into the piping bag fitted with a writing nozzle.

Spread the white fondant icing over the top (not the sides) of the lemon sponge.

Pipe fine lines of icing across the width of the cake, spacing them 1cm apart.

Using a co*cktail stick, gently drag the icing lines in opposite directions through the white fondant to feather.

Cut the cake into six even slices and serve.

Chocolate beetroot cake

This is Rosie’s mum’s chocolate beetroot cake — a moist, super-easy bake that everyone loves.

This is Rosie’s mum’s chocolate beetroot cake — a moist, super-easy bake that everyone loves. Rosie is pictured above

Hands-on: 20 mins

Bake: 35 mins

Serves 8

You will need:

  • 18cm round cake tins x 2, greased, then base-lined with baking paper

For the sponge

  • 200g salted butter, diced
  • 100g 70pc dark chocolate, broken into pieces
  • 200g fresh, cooked beetroot in natural juice, finely grated
  • 200g self-raising flour, sifted
  • 1 tsp baking powder
  • 50g dark cocoa powder
  • 250g dark brown soft sugar
  • 4 large eggs

For the chocolate fudge icing

  • 200g condensed milk
  • ½ tsp vanilla extract
  • 50g unsalted butter, diced
  • 100g 70pc dark chocolate, chopped

Heat the oven to 180c/fan 160/ 350f/gas 4. Place the butter in a medium pan over a low heat for about 1 minute, until melted.

Remove the pan from the heat and add the chocolate. Leave for 5 minutes, then stir until the chocolate has melted. Allow to cool for 10 minutes.

Place the beetroot in a large mixing bowl. Using a wooden spoon, stir in the flour, baking powder, cocoa, sugar and eggs, then stir in the cooled butter and chocolate mixture until fully combined.

Divide the mixture between the two cake tins and bake for 30-35 minutes, until a skewer inserted into the centres comes out clean.

When the icing is ready, spread one sponge, top-side down, evenly with half the icing. Stack the second sponge on top and spread with the remaining icing to finish

Cool in the tins for 5 minutes, then transfer to a wire rack to cool completely.

To make the icing, put the condensed milk in a small pan with the vanilla and warm over a low heat for 1-2 minutes, stirring continuously to prevent burning, until the milk is hot but not boiling.

Remove the pan from the heat and add the butter and chocolate. Leave for 2-3 minutes, then stir until the butter and chocolate have melted and the mixture is smooth.

Allow to cool until spreadable (about 1 hour).

When the icing is ready, spread one sponge, top-side down, evenly with half the icing. Stack the second sponge on top and spread with the remaining icing to finish.

Layered coffee cake

Dan’s version of his mum’s coffee cake is layered and topped with coffee-flavoured cream cheese frosting to balance out any bitterness, and then sprinkled with a sweet espresso brittle.

Dan’s version of his mum’s coffee cake is layered and topped with coffee-flavoured cream cheese frosting to balance out any bitterness, and then sprinkled with a sweet espresso brittle

Hands-on: 20mins

Bake: 50 mins

Serves 12

You will need:

  • 20cm round, deep cake tins or springform tins x 2, greased, base-lined with baking paper
  • 33 x 23cm baking tray, base and sides lined with baking paper

For the sponge

  • 2 tbsp espresso instant coffee powder
  • 1 tbsp boiling water
  • 340g unsalted butter, softened
  • 340g golden caster sugar
  • 6 large eggs, beaten
  • 1 tbsp golden syrup
  • 340g self-raising flour
  • 1 tsp baking powder

For the espresso brittle

  • 1 tsp espresso roasted coffee beans or instant coffee granules
  • 60g unsalted butter, softened
  • 25g liquid glucose
  • 4 tsp whole milk
  • 75g golden icing sugar, sifted

For the coffee frosting

  • 1 tbsp instant espresso coffee
  • 1 tsp boiling water
  • 200g unsalted butter, softened180g full-fat cream cheese
  • 500g golden icing sugar, sifted

Preheat the oven to 180c/fan 160/350f/gas 4.

For the sponge

Dissolve the coffee in the boiling water and leave to cool.

Beat the butter and sugar in a stand mixer fitted with the beater attachment, on medium speed for about 5 minutes, until light and creamy.

With the mixer on a low speed, gradually add the eggs, beating well between each addition.

Now add the golden syrup and prepared coffee and beat until combined. Sift the flour and baking powder into the creamed mixture, and use a metal spoon to fold gently until incorporated.

Divide the mixture between the two prepared tins and bake for 30-35 minutes, until risen and a skewer inserted into the centres comes out clean.

Cool in the tins for 5 minutes, then turn out onto a wire rack to cool completely. (Leave the oven on for the brittle.)

To make the brittle

Place the coffee beans in a resealable sandwich bag or sheet of folded baking paper. Roll a rolling pin over them to crush, then set aside.

Place the butter, glucose and milk in a small pan over a low heat and warm gently for about 1-2 minutes, just until the butter has melted. Add the icing sugar and stir until completely dissolved.

Increase the heat and boil, stirring, for about 4 minutes, until the mixture has been reduced by about a third and is syrup-like and thick enough to coat the back of the spoon (it will look thick and frothy). Remove the syrup from the heat and allow it to settle to look like a thick custard.

Cover the top of one cake with another layer of buttercream, making sure you leave enough for a generous topping, then stack the other cake on top, giving you a four-tiered cake

Then, add the crushed coffee beans or instant granules and stir until evenly distributed.

Pour the mixture onto the lined baking tray and spread out quickly and evenly so that it reaches the edges of the tray.

Bake the brittle for 12-15 minutes, until golden and caramel-like. It will look bubbly, but will settle once it’s out of the oven. Transfer the tray to a wire rack for the brittle to set.

To make the buttercream

Dissolve the coffee in the boiling water and leave to cool.

Put the butter and cream cheese in a mixing bowl and beat with an electric hand whisk until smooth and combined.

Gradually add the icing sugar, a few tablespoons at a time, and beat with a wooden spoon for 2-3 minutes, until fluffy. Add the coffee and beat well until combined.

Cut each cooled cake in half horizontally. Sandwich each cut cake with a generous amount of buttercream frosting.

Cover the top of one cake with another layer of buttercream, making sure you leave enough for a generous topping, then stack the other cake on top, giving you a four-tiered cake.

Top the cake with the remaining buttercream. Crush the brittle and sprinkle it over the top of the cake, to decorate.

You’ll have more brittle than you need — try sprinkling it over your morning porridge, or over vanilla ice cream.

Sticky gingerbread loaf

Thisis a family recipe that has been passed down to Michael from his great grandmother via his grandmother and mum.

In fact, it’s one of the first cakes he and his mum ever baked together.

This is a family recipe that has been passed down to Michael from his great grandmother via his grandmother and mum. In fact, it’s one of the first cakes he and his mum ever baked together

Hands-on: 20 mins

Bake: 1 hour

Serves 12

You will need: 900g loaf tin, greased, then lined (base and sides) with baking paper

For the sponge

  • 250g plain flour
  • 4 tsp ground ginger
  • 140ml whole milk
  • 1 tsp bicarbonate of soda
  • 100g sunflower spread
  • 100g dark muscovado sugar
  • 100g golden syrup
  • 100g black treacle
  • 1 egg

For the icing

  • 150g icing sugar, sifted
  • 4-5 tsp lemon juice

Heat the oven to 160c/fan 140c/315f/gas 2-3.

Leave to cool in the tin for 5 minutes, then transfer to a wire rack to cool completely.Once the cake is cool, drizzle the icing over the cake to finish

Sift the flour and ginger together into a large mixing bowl and set aside.

Measure 1 tablespoon of the milk into a small bowl and stir in the bicarbonate of soda.

Pour the remaining milk, along with the spread, sugar, syrup and treacle into a medium pan and place over a medium heat for about 2 minutes, until the spread has melted.

Leave the spread mixture to cool for 5 minutes, then pour it into the bowl over the flour and ginger.

Add the egg, and the bicarbonate of soda mixture and beat with a wooden spoon to a smooth, thick batter.

Pour the batter into the prepared tin and bake for 50-60 minutes, or until a skewer inserted into the centre comes out clean.

Leave to cool in the tin for 5 minutes, then transfer to a wire rack to cool completely.

Mix the icing sugar with enough lemon juice to make a thick pouring consistency. Once the cake is cool, drizzle the icing over the cake to finish.

Spanish lemon meringue cake

Thislemon meringue cake comes from Helena’s great-grandmother.

Her family love it so much that everyone stakes their claim straight after it comes out of the oven so they do not miss out.

This lemon meringue cake comes from Helena’s great-grandmother. Her family love it so much that everyone stakes their claim straight after it comes out of the oven

Hands-on: 25 mins

Bake: 25 mins

Serves 10

You will need:

  • 20cm round, loose-bottomed cake tin, greased, then lined (base and sides) with baking paper
  • 250g digestive biscuits
  • 110g unsalted butter, melted
  • 5 eggs, separated
  • 550g condensed milk
  • Juice of 5 lemons
  • 75g caster sugar

Heat the oven to 200c/fan 180c/400f/gas 6. Blitz the biscuits in a food processor to fine crumbs.

Remove 2 tablespoons of the crumbs and set aside. Add the melted butter to the crumbs in the food processor and blitz for a few seconds more until combined.

Transfer the buttery biscuit mixture to the prepared tin and use the back of a spoon to press it down firmly and evenly all the way to the edges of the tin to give an even base.

Place the egg yolks in a medium bowl. Using a balloon whisk, whisk in the condensed milk until fully incorporated. Then, slowly whisk in the lemon juice until combined.

Leave to cool in the tin for 30 minutes, then move it to the fridge to cool completely. When you’re ready to serve, release the cake from the tin, remove the baking paper and serve in slices

Pour the mixture on top of the biscuit base. Now place the egg whites in a clean, grease-free bowl and beat with an electric hand whisk to stiff peaks.

Whisk in the sugar, 1 tablespoon at a time, until the mixture forms a thick and glossy meringue. Spoon the meringue on top of the lemony layer in the tin.

Sprinkle the reserved biscuit mixture on top of the meringue and bake the lemon meringue cake for about 25 minutes, until the top is golden brown.

Leave to cool in the tin for 30 minutes, then move it to the fridge to cool completely.

When you’re ready to serve, release the cake from the tin, remove the baking paper and serve in slices.

Carrot & apple cake

Amelia’s recipe has evolved from her mum’s much-loved carrot and apple muffins.

Now a cake with cream cheese icing, it is a favourite with her work friends and makes the house smell lovely when baking.

Amelia’s recipe has evolved from her mum’s much-loved carrot and apple muffins

Hands-on: 30 mins

Bake: 1 hour

Serves 12

You will need:

  • 20cm round, deep cake tin, greased, then base-lined with baking paper.

For the sponge

  • 2 large eating apples, peeled, cored and grated
  • 100g carrots, peeled and grated
  • 200g plain wholemeal flour
  • 100g granulated sugar
  • 2 tsp baking powder
  • 1½ tsp ground cinnamon
  • 1½ tsp ground ginger
  • ¼ tsp salt
  • 65ml runny honey
  • 65ml maple syrup
  • 165ml vegetable oil
  • 3 eggs
  • 1½ tsp vanilla extract
  • 80g raisins
  • 50g walnuts, chopped

For the buttercream icing

  • 50g unsalted butter, softened
  • 100g icing sugar, sifted
  • 50ml double cream
  • 100g full-fat cream cheese
  • 50g walnuts, finely chopped
  • Pinch of ground cinnamon

Heat the oven to 180c/fan 160c/350f/gas 4. Put all the sponge ingredients in a mixing bowl.

With a wooden spoon, beat them together to make a soft batter. Pour this into the prepared tin and bake for 1 hour, until golden brown, risen, and a skewer inserted into the centre comes out clean.

Leave to cool in the tin for 10 minutes, then turn out onto a wire rack to cool completely.

To make the buttercream icing

Using an electric hand whisk, beat the butter in a bowl until it is really soft.

Add the icing sugar and whisk on a low speed until combined and smooth.

Add the double cream and whisk again for about 4 minutes, until thickened, then add the cream cheese and whisk again, briefly, until thick and creamy.

Spread the buttercream icing over the top and sides of the cake and sprinkle the walnuts over. Dust lightly with the pinch of cinnamon.

Leave to cool in the tin for 10 minutes, then turn out onto a wire rack to cool completely.Dust lightly with the pinch of cinnamon

Lime and coconut bundt drizzle

Inspired by his wife’s lemon drizzle, Phil first road tested his lime cake at a bike-club quiz night. Over time, he has refined it further — by using a bundt tin and adding lime crunch.

Phil first road tested his lime cake at a bike-club quiz night. Over time, he has refined it further — by using a bundt tin and adding lime crunch

Hands-on: 25 mins

Bake: 45 mins

Serves 12

You will need:

  • 1.5-litre bundt tin
  • Greased sheet of baking paper
  • Small disposable piping bag.

For the sponge

  • 230g unsalted butter, softened
  • 230g caster sugar
  • 4 eggs, beaten
  • 230g self-raising flour, sifted
  • 65g desiccated coconut
  • Juice and finely grated zest of 1 unwaxed lime

For the lime crunch

  • Finely grated zest of 2 unwaxed limes
  • 2 tsp caster sugar

For the drizzle

  • 3 tbsp lime juice
  • 3 tbsp icing sugar, sifted

For the icing

  • 100g icing sugar, sifted
  • 1 tbsp lime juice

Heat the oven to 180c/fan 160c/350f/gas 4. Beat the butter and sugar in a stand mixer on medium speed for 5-6 minutes, until pale and creamy.

On a low speed, add the eggs, a little at a time, beating well between each addition.

Fold in the flour, coconut, lime juice and zest with a metal spoon until just combined. Spoon the mixture into the prepared tin and level the surface.

Allow the cake to cool for 10 minutes in the tin, then transfer to a wire rack. Leave until the icing is set slightly before sprinkling the lime crunch over

Bake for 40-45 minutes, until golden brown and a skewer inserted into the ring comes out clean.

To make the lime crunch, mix together the zest and caster sugar then place on baking paper to dry slightly.

The Great British Bake Off: The Big Book of Amazing Cakes

Make the drizzle by stirring the lime juice and icing sugar together in a bowl.

When the cake is ready, remove from the oven, prick all over with a skewer and spoon half the drizzle over. Allow the cake to cool for 10 minutes in the tin, then transfer to a wire rack.

Drizzle over the remaining lime and sugar mix. Leave to cool. Now put the icing sugar in a bowl and add enough lime juice to make a thick, pourable icing. Spoon into the piping bag, snip off the end and drizzle over the cake.

Leave until the icing is set slightly before sprinkling the lime crunch over.

Extractedfrom The Great BritishBake Off: The BigBook of Amazing Cakes published by Sphere, £20.

© Love Productions Ltd 2019

Celebrate 10 years of Bake Off with recipes from judge Prue Leith (2024)
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